OUR LANES
Specific info on our house
TECHNICAL STUFF
Common to all houses
Building Erected
Affiliation
Lane Surface
Approach Surface
Pinsetters
Scoring
Ball Return
Lane Machine
USBC Sanctioned
Pro Shop?
ATM?
Snack Bar?
Lounge?
Credit Cards?
1959
Independent
Synthetic
Synthetic
Brunswick A-2
Automatic
Subway
Kegal Kustodian
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Lane Distance
Lane Width
Distance to Arrows
First Row Approach Dots
Second "          "           "
Downlane Markers

Bowling Pins
60 Feet
42" (39 Boards)
15 Feet
12 Feet
15 Feet
36 Feet
40 Feet
15" High
4.75" Wide
3 Lbs 8oz
Our In-House Patter Here
Document is in PDF format
SOME BOWLING TRIVA
Bowling, sometimes called tenpins, is an indoor game played on a polished wooden or synthetic floor by individuals or teams. Bowling is most popular in the U.S. where more than 80 million people actively participate.

The International Bowling Museum and Hall of Fame has replicas of artifacts for a game similar to bowling which were found in the tomb of an ancient Egyptian youth who died approximately 5,200 BC. Ancient Polynesians rolled stones at objects from a distance of 60 feet (18.29 meters) - the same distance as from foul line to headpin.

The earliest known legislation against bowling dates to 14th Century England. The sport had become so popular that people were neglecting the archery practice necessary for national defense during the 100 Year War (a misnomer, since it actually lasted from 1337 to 1453). Both King Edward III who reigned from 1327-1377 and King Richard II (1377-1399) banned the game. From Europe to America, bowling has been banned throughout the world for the "evil it leashes on society."

In 1841, Connecticut banned "bowling at the game of ninepins" because of widespread gambling. Other states followed suit. It is popularly believed that today's game of tenpins was devised to circumvent the laws against the game of ninepins. An outdoor game for most of its history, indoor bowling became popular in the mid-nineteenth century after the introduction of indoor lanes in New York in 1840.
In 1920 prohibition laws lead to increases in bowling as proprietors discover that patrons want to bowl, even if they can't drink.  (Editor's Note:  What???)

Lane oil, or conditioner, was originally applied to the entire length of the lane to protect it's surface.  In the 1960's, when automatic pinsetters became more common, this caused problems in the pinsetter machinery.  This lead to leaving the back ends "dry" and hence, a whole new game...